Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Welcome, English 238/002 Students!




1861 photo of girls in the school yard of the Colored Orphan Asylum, located at 5th Ave. & 43rd St. in New York City.


Good afternoon, students! Here is the blog for our class. I will post all links, handouts, and readings here. Take a look!


All best,


Prof. Williams

8 comments:

Darnell said...

During several millenia, blacks in ancient Egypt made numerous contributions to medicine and were acknowledge as inventors of the art of medicine. They produced the earliest physicians, medical knowledge, and medical literature. They contributed to the development of medicine in ancient Greece. Ancient writers including Herodotus, Isocrates, and Diodores, affirms this. Modern presentations of ancient medicine, however, deprive blacks of the knowledge of their early contribution to medicine by ignoring or subtly misrepresenting the black identity of ancient Egyptians. Blacks are currently under represented in US medical schools. It is propsed that the recognition of contributions of blacks to early history of Western medicine would inspire black students to study medicine.(Frederick Newsome, Blacks in science: Ancient and Modern Journal Of African Civilizations April & November 1983 issues )

Amatullah said...

Oh!!! I couldn't figure out how to use this thing. So, I kinda sorta accidentally made my own blogspot. My bad. Here is the link anyway.

http://passingbylarsen.blogspot.com/2010/01/intoduction.html

So, how do I get rid of my blog spot?

Amatullah said...

http://passingbylarsen.blogspot.com/2010/01/intoduction.html

Amatullah said...

http://passingbylarsen.blogspot.
com/2010/01/intoduction.html

Sorry....for some reason, the link kept getting cut off. This is my last attempt at this.

Darnell said...

Eric Williams wrote Capitalism and Slavery. He was the first African-Trinidadian to hold the position of Prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago.

Ruiz-Taylor said...

Quote of the day...."It is our earnest hope for mankind that while we gain the moon, we shall not lose the world" Dr. Eric Williams

Professor R. Williams said...

Great commentary, students! Keep it up!

Amatullah said...

When are we going to talk about "Bluest Eye." I was kinda caught in the middle of my sentence when we didn't have class the other day. How about the irony in the little Dick-and-Jane story as it parallels and contrasts to Pecola's life. She is quite an odd writer, to say the least.....